TYL’s Boeuf Bourguignon (Beef Stew)

TYL’s BEEF BOURGUIGNON

We’ve been sitting on this recipe for over a year. We’ve been waiting for the perfect time to share this recipe and now is the time. The weather is cool and kind of dreary and it’s perfect weather for Beef Stew or if you’re being classy, Boeuf Bourguignon. Which is beef cooked in a red wine sauce, which is basically pretentious beef stew.

The dish itself originated in the Burgundy region of France which in French is pronounced Bourgogne. Get it? Boeuf (Beef) Bourgogne (Burgundy)? Magic! The Burgundy region is located South-East of Paris. Tons of well known  dishes come from the Burgundy region like Coq Au Vin, which is basically, according to Julia, the same dish as Boeuf Bourguignon, but with chicken. Escargot, Persille Ham, and Pain d’épices (spice bread or gingerbread) to name a few also come out of the Burgundy region.

Boeuf Bourguignon is a wonderful dish for the fall and winter months because it is hardy, warm and will keep you full for hours. The dish is prepared by braising the beef in a red wine and beef stock, and you traditionally use a burgundy wine. According to Julia the wine doesn’t need to be expensive because you’re cooking it, not drinking it. So don’t worry about getting a fancy bottle of wine for this dish. Because at the end of the day, it doesn’t matter if your wine is expensive or not.

What’s funny about this dish is it started out as a peasants dish  because traditionally tougher cuts of meats were used, but while braising they became tender. But over the years the dish grew into “haute cuisine” and became a classic staple in French Cooking.

Julia Child once said that Boeuf Bourguignon was ,”certainly one of the most delicious beef dishes concocted by man”.

And you know what? We have to agree. We’ve actually spent a lot of time working on this recipe and  are really excited to share it with you. If you have the time, we also suggest googling Julia Child’s Boeuf Bourguignon and watching the very first episode of the The French Chef . She’s so incredibly funny and is a riot to watch.

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Piña Colada Ice Cream

Pina Colada Ice Cream

We’re in the middle of moving. Again. And it’s been crazy. We want to apologize for the lack of updates, but we truly mean it, we’re back. We have so many wonderful recipes to make and share with you.  We thought that our apartment would be perfect for our photos, but it turns out living in a dark box with no direct light doesn’t do well for photographing food or our general overall happiness. We now know how much we love and appreciate sunlight.

So as of right now, we haven’t found the perfect place so we’re moving back home. And you know what? There is absolutely no shame in having to move back home. We know a lot of people think having to move back home is a downgrade, but instead of suffering for another year in a crappy apartment that has horrible neighbors, no sunlight, and management that never answers their phones or returns calls, we would wait and find the perfect place or let it find us! No sense in rushing into something we know we’re going to be unhappy with.

#millennialproblems

Okay, so anyway, we’re back and earlier this summer we actually were planning on sharing this recipe, but time got the better of us, and we never got around to it. But just because summer is over (in the Northern hemisphere), that doesn’t mean we can’t bring summer into your lives this fall and winter. So why not relive those wonderful summer memories with delicious and creamy Pina Colada Ice Cream!

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Grandma’s Italian Meatballs

Grandma's Meatballs

Grandma's Meatballs

So yesterday, you (hopefully) made the sauce now today you make the meatballs! We may not be Italian by blood, but we think that we could definitely make any Italian Grandma happy with these deliciously moist meatballs.

Now, a little history on the meatball. In Italy, meatballs aren’t actually called meatballs. In Italy they’re called polpettes,  and are normally eaten by themselves as a full meal or in soups and are made with any kind of meat ranging from fish to turkey. If you see spaghetti and meatballs on a Italian menu, it’s likely there to cater towards American tourists.

Come to think of it, neither of us can actually remember encountering spaghetti and meatballs on our Italian trip last year!

Pellegrino Artusi who was a Florentine silk merchant in his early days and retired and followed his passion for food, cooking, recipes and travel. In 1891 Pellegrino published the first modern Italian cookbook and was dubbed the father of Italian Cuisine’. His cookbook which was titled (in English) ‘The Science of Cooking and the Art of Eating Well: A Practical Manual for Families.”

In this book he brought together a lot of regional Italian cuisines and made them accessible for all. He was also the first to write for the home chef and make cooking easy for all. He talks about the Polpettes in the book and said “Don’t think I’m pretentious enough to teach you how to make meatballs. This is a dish that everybody can make, starting with the donkey.”

So how did Polpettes become what we know as meatballs? The Italians came to America and were able to spend more money on food. They went from spending 75 % of their income on food to only 25%, and meat which went from being a rare luxury, to a every day staple.


Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 small red onion, minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried basil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 cup bread crumbs, divided into half cups

Step 1:

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Step 2:

In a medium bowl mix together onions, basil, parsley, garlic powder, salt red pepper flakes and 1/2 cup of bread crumbs. Grate in the parmesan and mix together.

Step 3: 

In a large bowl, mix together both meats gently, hehe. Add the breadcrumbs mixture and again gently incorporate the meat and breadcrumb mixtures.

Step 4: 

Put the remaining 1/2 cup of breadcrumbs into a bowl. Weigh out 1.5 oz balls and then coat them with breadcrumbs in the bowl. Place on mini muffin pan holes. hehe.

Step 5:

Bake for about 20 minutes, more if they are still pink in the center. If you want to finish the meatballs in the sauce for a few minutes afterwards. EAT THEM!

Grandma's Meatballs


We dedicate this post to our Grandmas who are no longer with us, but we think about all the time. Especially when we’re in the Kitchen .

Grandmas
Christie with her Mom and Grandma Prieto
grandma 2

Christie and Marlee with Grandma Alyce Hunka in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

grandma 3Marlee with her Grandma Parrish in Texas.

Velvety Marinara Sauce

It’s Saturday and you know what you should make? Our classic and delicious marinara sauce. We know traditionally, most Italian’s make their sauce (or gravy) on Sundays but here at TYL, we’re a little non traditional so Saturdays are marinara day!

Besides, any good chef (or home cook) knows that a sauce, gravy, chili, stew, etc. tastes better the next day…so break out of the norm and make this sauce today!

There are many theories as to the origins of marinara sauce.  Most people would just assume that the moment Italy was formed BAM! there was marinara sauce, but no! It first appeared in an Italian cookbook in 1692.  Apparently the tomato was a fruit of the New World, and according to some theories, were brought over by Spanish explorers to Naples, a major port city.  Marinara means mariner or sailor, so some believe that tomato sauce was something that the sailor’s wives made when their husbands returned from sea to feed them.

Others believe that the sailors themselves made the sauce to bring with them to sea because the high acid content kept the food edible longer. One last theory is that tomatoes were used in place of a different fruit that might have been previously used in a pasta sauce, such as figs or apricots. Weird to think that tomato sauce is actually a savory fruit sauce!

Also, one possibility as to why some people call it tomato gravy, is because of the mother sauce tomate, where a roux is used to start the sauce.  A roux is traditionally used to make a gravy, hence, tomato gravy! Soon we’ll do an entire post just about the mother sauces, so stay tuned for that!

Velvety Marinara Sauce

Ingredients

  • 4 roma tomatoes
  • olive oil
  • garlic salt
  • pepper
  • 1 small red onion, mined
  • 1-28 oz can of crushed tomatoes
  • 1 cup of red wine
  • dried basil
  • dried oregano
  • 3 tbsp of tomato paste
  • 3 cloves of garlic, smashed
  • Grated Parmesan

Step 1: 

Pre-heat oven to 400°F.  Cut Roma tomatoes in half and place them in a bowl together, pour some olive oil on top and season with garlic salt and pepper. Toss them around until all the tomatoes are coated. Place them on a baking sheet and place them in the oven for 20 to 30 minutes.

Step 2:

Heat olive oil in a heavy bottom pot. Put smashed garlic into the oil until you can smell it, about 2 minutes. Then take it out of the oil and keep it until later. Add the onions and season with salt, dried basil and dried oregano. (add some rosemary salt if you want! Let it simmer for 5 minutes.

Step 3:

Open the can of crushed tomatoes and add it to the pot with the onions. Use a swish of red wine to clean out everything in the can. Let it simmer for 10 minutes.

Step 4:

Add 1 cup of red wine, but we always follow Queen Ina’s philosophy of there could never be enough wine! But if you aren’t as big of a fan of wine as Ina Garten, then feel free to omit it, and add more tomato paste in it’s place. Let it simmer again for 10 minutes.

Step 5:

Now that the Roma tomatoes are out of the oven, with a spatula transfer the tomatoes to the pot. Also, add the smashed garlic that you save from the beginning. Let them all party in the hot tub for another 10-15 minutes.

Step 6:

Turn off the heat and let it cool for 5 minutes. Grab the blender, and blend the sauce mixture in batches. Return to the pot, taste, add grated parmesan to your liking and any seasonings you feel need to be there. Enjoy!

Velvety Marinara Sauce

Banana Pudding Ice Cream

Banana pudding is considered a Southern staple, but apparently it was created in New York and adopted by the south! Bananas started becoming a star at fruit stands only after the Civil War, when goods were capable of being transported from the Caribbean and Central America much faster.

The first printed recipe of Banana Pudding was actually in the New England magazine, Good Housekeeping, and was compared to an English trifle. Like trifles, they originally used sponge cake, but in 1920 a more affordable option was used: Vanilla wafers, or as most know them as Nilla wafers.

So today we give you our Southern (California) Banana Pudding ICE CREAM! Yeah, you heard right, we made a dish that was already devilishly delicious into something truly diabolical! You feel compelled to have more and more, especially after some salty, savory, succulent BBQ food. It’s the perfect companion to anybody’s 4th of July BBQ extravaganza, so get started people!

Banana Pudding Pie Ice Cream

Banana Pudding Pie Ice Cream

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Cups Half and Half
  • 1/2 Brown Sugar (Packed)
  • 1/2 Cup Sugar
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Salt
  • 2 Eggs (Beaten)
  • 1 Cup Heavy Cream
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • 1 Tablespoon Vanilla Bean Paste**
  • 3 Ripe Bananas (Mashed)
  • 2 Cups Crushed Vanilla Wafers

**If you don’t have Vanilla Bean Paste, extract can be used in its place.

Step 1:

In a saucepan, combine half and half, sugars, salt and vanilla; turn on the heat to medium-low and stir occasionally until the sugar is completely dissolved (about five minutes).

Step 2: 

In a medium bowl, beat the eggs using an electric mixer until they are a pale yellow. We like to beat them until they achieve the “ribbon stage”.

Step 3: 

When the sugar has dissolved, very slowly pour half of the cream and sugar mixture into the eggs; whisking constantly so the eggs don’t curdle. Transfer the egg mixture back to the sauce pan with remaining cream mixture.

Step 4: 

At this point, mix in the heavy cream and the vanilla paste. Cook the mixture of a medium-low heat until the mixture thickens and is able to coat the back of a wooden spoon; about five to ten minutes.

Step 5: 

If needed, pour the mixture through a fine wire sieve. Cool the mixture to room temperature.

Step 6: 

While your base mixture is cooling, take your very ripe bananas (the darker the better) and mash them well. Set aside.

Step 7: 

When the base mixture is cool, stir in the banana mixture and pour into your ice cream maker. Freeze according to the manufactures setting.

While the ice cream is freezing, gently crush your vanilla wafers. During the last five to minutes of the freezing process, mix in most of the wafer cookies. When the mixture is finished, transfer to a freezer safe container. Top with leftover crushed cookies. Freeze until firm and serve.

Banana Pudding Pie Ice Cream