Traditional Carne Asada

Today feels like the perfect BBQ weather, so we give you the perfect food accompaniment: Carne Asada! Grill it up with a chilled beer in hand (We like Modelo) and you’ve got it made.

If you don’t have a grill you can always use a grill plan like this.

Traditional Carne Asada

Traditional Carne Asada

Traditional Carne Asada 

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons Carne Asada Seasoning*
  • Juice from one Lime (fresh)
  • 1/2 Cup Orange Juice
  • 1/2 White Onion (Thinly Sliced)
  • 1 Bunch Cilantro (Chopped) *Optional*
  • 2 Pounds Skirt or Flank steak

*Equal parts: salt, garlic powder, sugar, paprika. Dashes: Cumin, oregano, black pepper, cayenne pepper. ( You can use what’s leftover as a season salt for anything else).

Step 1: 

In a small bowl, mix together lime juice, orange juice, seasoning and cilantro.

Step 2: 

In a shallow dish, place the carne asada and onions down. Cover with the marinade making sure to coat both sides of the meat. Cover and place in the fridge for a minimum of at least 45 minutes.

Remember the longer you allow it marinate, the more flavor the meat will have.

Step 3: 

Thirty to forty minutes before you plan on grilling your meat, remove from the fridge and allow to come to room temperature.

By doing this, the meat will cook more evenly.

Traditional Carne Asada

Step 4: 

Grill over medium heat for about 2-3 minutes per side. Allow to rest for five minutes before slicing and enjoying.

Eat with tortillas and all the fixings or just by itself! Just enjoy it!

Traditional Carne Asada

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Classic Chimichurri

Classic Chimichurri

Today’s recipe is a chimichurri which is traditionally a green herb sauce to serve over grilled meat. The recipe origins can be traced back to Rio de la Plata, Argentina. Traditionally, chimichurri is made by blending parsley, garlic, mint, and oregano with oil.

Before we made this recipe, we totally thought the main green herb in this dish was cilantro but after doing some research, we realized that cilantro is the last thing that would be put into this wonderful dish, and for that we are thankful! Because, if you didn’t know you know now, we really dislike Cilantro. Christie HATES it, and Marlee (me) strongly dislikes it.

A few Sunday’s back we invited our friend Claudia over dinner, and we asked her if she could have anything for Sunday dinner, what would it be. And this is what she wanted. We were a little nervous making something we’d never made before*, but then we realized, it’s just like making pesto! You allow the food processor to do all the work, and all you really have to do is season the meat, and it cook it.

*According to Christie, after proofreading this, she informed me that we actually did make a chimichurri sauce once before but she refused to eat it because there was cilantro in it. I personally don’t recall this memory, but that’s okay. Enjoy our recipe! And remember there is nothing to be afraid of in the kitchen, except maybe the garbage disposal. Those are scary.

Classic Chimichurri

Classic Chimichurri

Classic Chimichurri 

Ingredients

Chimichurri 

  • 2 Cup Flat Leaf Parsley (Fresh)
  • 1 Cup Mint Leaves (Fresh)
  • 1 Cup Oregano Leaves (Fresh)
  • 1 Cup Garlic Olive Oil
  • 4 Teaspoons Red Pepper Flakes
  • 16 Cloves Garlic
  • 2 Pounds Skirt Steak

Dry Rub 

  • 2 Tablespoons Oregano Leaves (Dried)
  • 2 Tablespoons Basil Leaves (Dried)
  • 1 Tablespoon Parsley Flakes (Dried)
  • 1 Tablespoon Thyme Leaves (Dried)
  • 1 Tablespoon Kosher Salt
  • 1/2 Tablespoon Freshly Ground Pepper
  • 1/2 Tablespoons Smoked Paprika
  • 2 Teaspoons Garlic Powder
  • 1 Teaspoon Onion Powder

Step 1: 

For the dry rub, mix all the ingredients in a small bowl and set aside. How easy was that?

Step 2: 

In a food processor combine the parsley, mint, oregano, garlic, and red pepper flakes. Pulse until broken down, 2 to 3 pulses.

Step 3: 

Next add the olive oil and pulse until smooth.

Step 4: 

Using as much dry rub as you’d like, cover your your skirt steak with your dry rub. Make sure you massage it into your meat, you want that flavor to go everywhere.

Step 5: 

Next, add about half of the chimichurri sauce and massage that into the meat as well for maximum flavor.  Cover and refrigerate for at least four hours. Remove the meat about 30 minutes before you plan on cooking.

Step 6: 

You can either grill your meat on your grill or in a large skillet on the stove. We use a stovetop griddle that lays on top of the burners. Super helpful!

Okay, so turn your grill or pan to high heat and allow to heat for a few minutes. When your cooking device is good and hot, lay your meat down and cook for about 4 to 5 minutes per side.

Step 7: 

Allow the meat to rest for at least five minutes, and then cut the meat across the grain and serve with the rest of your classic chimichurri sauce.

Classic Chimichurri

(That lovely mouth you see is our friend Claudia, anxiously awaiting our food)

Classic Chimichurri

Grandma’s Italian Meatballs

Grandma's Meatballs

Grandma's Meatballs

So yesterday, you (hopefully) made the sauce now today you make the meatballs! We may not be Italian by blood, but we think that we could definitely make any Italian Grandma happy with these deliciously moist meatballs.

Now, a little history on the meatball. In Italy, meatballs aren’t actually called meatballs. In Italy they’re called polpettes,  and are normally eaten by themselves as a full meal or in soups and are made with any kind of meat ranging from fish to turkey. If you see spaghetti and meatballs on a Italian menu, it’s likely there to cater towards American tourists.

Come to think of it, neither of us can actually remember encountering spaghetti and meatballs on our Italian trip last year!

Pellegrino Artusi who was a Florentine silk merchant in his early days and retired and followed his passion for food, cooking, recipes and travel. In 1891 Pellegrino published the first modern Italian cookbook and was dubbed the father of Italian Cuisine’. His cookbook which was titled (in English) ‘The Science of Cooking and the Art of Eating Well: A Practical Manual for Families.”

In this book he brought together a lot of regional Italian cuisines and made them accessible for all. He was also the first to write for the home chef and make cooking easy for all. He talks about the Polpettes in the book and said “Don’t think I’m pretentious enough to teach you how to make meatballs. This is a dish that everybody can make, starting with the donkey.”

So how did Polpettes become what we know as meatballs? The Italians came to America and were able to spend more money on food. They went from spending 75 % of their income on food to only 25%, and meat which went from being a rare luxury, to a every day staple.


Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 small red onion, minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried basil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 cup bread crumbs, divided into half cups

Step 1:

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Step 2:

In a medium bowl mix together onions, basil, parsley, garlic powder, salt red pepper flakes and 1/2 cup of bread crumbs. Grate in the parmesan and mix together.

Step 3: 

In a large bowl, mix together both meats gently, hehe. Add the breadcrumbs mixture and again gently incorporate the meat and breadcrumb mixtures.

Step 4: 

Put the remaining 1/2 cup of breadcrumbs into a bowl. Weigh out 1.5 oz balls and then coat them with breadcrumbs in the bowl. Place on mini muffin pan holes. hehe.

Step 5:

Bake for about 20 minutes, more if they are still pink in the center. If you want to finish the meatballs in the sauce for a few minutes afterwards. EAT THEM!

Grandma's Meatballs


We dedicate this post to our Grandmas who are no longer with us, but we think about all the time. Especially when we’re in the Kitchen .

Grandmas
Christie with her Mom and Grandma Prieto
grandma 2

Christie and Marlee with Grandma Alyce Hunka in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

grandma 3Marlee with her Grandma Parrish in Texas.